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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the day that we pay tribute to them. and women are on the way. washington will never be the same. but first, the president's lease on the white house has just been extended. just what is the mandate? >>> good morning. i'm melissa harris-perry. all week the democratic and republican political operatives and strategists have been sifting through exit polling data trying to piece together the how and why of president obama's reelection. poring over data of turnout and the racial and socioeconomic composition of the winning coalition and breakdowns of what issues drove the electorate to the polls, all the pundits and prognosticators were looking for the formula that added up to a win for the president. now, clearly nate silver has decoded the calculus of probability. but now the question shifted from who will win to what are the voters trying to tell us? and not even nate did definitively answer that. here's what we do know. voters turned out for president barack obama in droves. despite having a somewhat smaller electoral map than in 2008, this is one of the biggest democratic wins
us, is washington already forgetting about ohio? plus, the gift that keeps on giving. that will beeping sound you hear is the gop bus backing up over mitt romney. >>> and our national obsession with abe lincoln. but first, the power struggle continues. it is deja vu all over again. >>> good saturday morning. i'm melissa harris-perry. now, if you've been paying attention to the news in the past week, you've probably been hearing some big confusing and scary sounding words. words like budget crisis, deficit sequestration, and of course, the fiscal cliff. listening to breathless elected officials discuss the fiscal cliff can be terrifying. as the story goes, we've made some bad choices over the years. we've tried to outrun it, but in the ends we're trapped and it sounds like like our country is facing this. ♪ but let's just take a moment and breathe. because fear is not going to help. and facts will. here are some of the facts. if a new plan for the federal budget is not reached between congress and the white house by the end of the year, january 1, 2013 will be the fi
than ever before. and if you want some people in washington who know what women's lives look like, send some women to washington. ♪ [ male announcer ] it's time for medicare open enrollment. are you ready? time to compare plans and see what's new. you don't have to make changes, but it's good to look. maybe you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ medicare open enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ >>> admit it, at some point we've all said it, that size doesn't matter. but, but, it sure does. especially when it comes to the number of women in elected office. 17 women currently serve as u.s. senators. 73 out of 435 is the number of women who are members of the u.s. house of representatives. in total, that means that roughly 17% of the 535 seats in the 112th congress are occupied by women. if women want to change that balance, they're going to have to run for office. this year 18 women are run for the senate. that's breaking the record of 14 set in 2010. on the ho
narratives that we had a problem. we had dysfunction in washington. the republicans said well, we've got all this uncertainty and business feels they're being demonized and don't want to invest money. the democrats essentially said we have tremendous inequality and the middle class isn't stable. until we build a middle class, no thriving economy. we're still there. we voetded for the status quo. the republican position is still, let's not give this president any victories. let's not participate in real sustaining economic recovery and the president, yes, he's stronger than he was before the election. but he's still somewhat constrained. i think the public understands there's a lot of uncertainty. we may go over this cliff. some say it's not a cliff. it's a hill. certainly it would be good to have higher tax rates for wealthier people. it might not be a long-term catastrophe. we get some reform out of it. let's remember, the deals that we're discussing to avert the cliff involve balancing a budget deficit that was a lot of fun for people on the take, the military defense contractors who got p
their bargaining power. if they stick, the state of washington and colorado may become some of our more popular tourist destination as both passed initiatives to legalize recreational marijuana use although it remains to be seen if they face a challenge by the justice department. same-sex marriage, maine, maryland, washington, d.c., allow same sex couples to marry. excuse me, washington. they join the sis states and the district of columbia that have passed such measures. what can these victories teach us about the larger democratic party? for one, it tells us there is a little power in the left ring of the democratic base. while they may not have won everything, small victories can add up to major change. i think it also tells us that we need to be a little careful because, for example, people having the right to marry whomever they want is a fantastic step in the right direction, but i submit having the civil rights of anybody on the ballot is a concern. at the table, we have wade harrison, raoul reyes and nancy giles, writer, social commentator and one of my favorite people. laura, blue grit
reagan. changed tax policy, a similar situation to now. i don't know many people who trust washington to have any more money to spend. >> i think reagan is a great example. he did cut taxes and we had exploiting deficits in 1980s. >> then he raised them. >> then he raised them. we do also have another example from the 1990s, which is president clinton, who had a balanced budget. he asked the wealthy to pay more. the rates went up to 39.6. we had eight years of very strong growth. >> including surplus. >> i'm not saying the taxes cause that but we know that having higher taxes on wealthy americans didn't lead to a recession as republicans have argued. that's what's really daunting about the whole discussion about taxes. the fact that we have no real idea what mitt romney will do on taxes as president other than if we take him at his word, it does mean that middle class americans will pay more in taxes. either he is not being honest with us or middle class americans will see a tax increase. that's the choice people have. >> he also seems to be threatening us a little bit. ari, i want yo
washington to dine at the white house was taken as an outrage in many corridors. america today is a world away from the cruel and prideful bigotry of that time. there is no better evidence of this than the election of an african-american to the presidency of the united states. >> senator mccain was right. that at no other time in american history could this moment have been possible. and even as the opponent, he was a bit swept up in that moment. remember the front page of the new york times after the election, obama, racial barrier falls in decisive victory. the victory was decisive, but the barrier had not fallen. then senator obama was simply hoisted over it, propelled by decades of civil rights demonstrations. hard won legislative victories, educational opportunities and shifting racial boundaries. but senator mccain, "the new york times" and frankly many pundits writing in the heady moments of the victory failed to articulate how firmly the barriers remained intabt. the win was a culmination, not the single definitive, most sought after culmination, but a culmination of racial strugg
in nine states in washington, d.c. that leaves family in 41 states without access to the economic benefits of marriage. why this narrow focus on marriage at all. since 1970, marriage rates have dropped more than 15%. divorce rates have climbed. fewer people who can marry are choosing to do so. more people who do marry are choosing to exit. last year, the number of unmarried people in the united states was 44%, including single parents, people with partners, those who are widows and people happily choosing single life. being unmarried does not mean you are without family. law is often blind to these families. to those where kids being raised around the biological offspring of a married couple. what if your kids are really your neighbors or your nephews or your grandkids. narrow definitions of family can make everything from student loans to doctor visits that much harder. it can be adoption for loving lgbt families or single women tough if they are banned from marrying or if policy treetsz them as if their households are unstable. can we begin to talk about the quirky combinations of family
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)